Forex trading guide

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Here is our simple Forex trading guide… The first concept to know in order to start with this guide is : “what is it forex?
So, basically, the Forex market is where banks, businesses, governments, investors and traders come to exchange and speculate on currencies. The Forex market is also referred to as the ‘Fx market’, ‘Currency market’, ‘Foreign exchange currency market’ or ‘Foreign currency market’, and it is the largest and most liquid market in the world with an average daily turnover of $3.98 trillion.

The Fx market is open 24 hours a day, 5 days a week with the most important world trading centers being located in London, New York, Tokyo, Zurich, Frankfurt, Hong Kong, Singapore, Paris, and Sydney.

It should be noted that there is no central marketplace for the Forex market; trading is instead said to be conducted ‘over the counter’; it’s not like stocks where there is a central marketplace with all orders processed like the NYSE. Forex is a product quoted by all the major banks, and not all banks will have the exact same price. Now, the broker platforms take all these feeds from the different banks and the quotes we see from our broker are an approximate average of them.

Now we can introduce to you forex trading. The aim of forex trading is simple. Just like any other form of speculation, you want to buy a currency at one price and sell it at higher price (or sell a currency at one price and buy it at a lower price) in order to make a profit.

Some confusion can arise as the price of one currency is always, of course, determined in another currency. For instance, the price of one British pound could be measured as, say, two US dollars, if the exchange rate between GBP and USD is 2 exactly. In forex trading terms this value for the British pound would be represented as a price of 2.0000 for the forex pair GBP/USD.

Currencies are grouped into pairs to show the exchange rate between the two currencies; in other words, the price of the first currency in the second currency. Some commonly traded forex pairs (known as ‘major’ pairs) are EUR/USD, USD/JPY and EUR/GBP, but it is also possible to trade many minor currencies (also known as ‘exotics’) such as the Mexican peso (MXN), the Polish zloty (PLN) or the Norwegian krone (NOK). As these currencies are not so frequently traded the market is less liquid and so the forex trading spread may be wider.

Like any other trading price, the spread for a forex pair consists of a bid price at which you can sell (the lower end of the spread) and an offer price at which you can buy (the higher end of the spread). It is important to note, however, for each forex pair, which way round you are trading.

When buying, the spread always reflects the price for buying the first currency of the forex pair with the second. So an offer price of 1.3000 for EUR/USD means that it will cost you $1.30 to buy €1.
You would buy if you think that the price of the euro against the dollar is going to rise, that is, if you think you will later be able to sell your €1 for more than $1.30. When selling, the spread gives you the price for selling the first currency for the second.

So a bid price of 1.3000 for EUR/USD means that you can sell €1 for $1.30. You would sell if you think that the price of the euro is going to fall against the dollar, so you can buy back your €1 for less than the $1.30 you originally paid for it.

Forex trading has several benefits:

-The forex market is the largest and most liquid of the financial markets.

-Daily activity often exceeds $4 trillion USD a day, with over $1.5 trillion of that conducted in the form of spot trading.

-Forex spot trades consist of a contract to trade a given amount of a currency pair derivative with a market-maker, at the advertised buy / sell price (the spot rate).
It is the existence of volatility within the forex market that enables trader’s to take advantage of exchange rate fluctuations for speculative purposes.

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